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School of Labor and Employment Relations University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Simon Restubog

Professor

School of Labor and Employment Relations
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247A LER Building, 504 E. Armory Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820-6297

Education

PhD Organizational Psychology, University of Queensland

MA Counseling, De La Salle University

BA Psychology and BS Education, De La Salle University

Prior to moving to the United States, Dr. Simon Restubog held academic positions at the Australian National University, University of New South Wales and the University of Queensland in Australia. 

Research Interests

My program of research focuses on three streams: employment relationships, the dark side of human behavior in organizations and career development.

First, I study employment relationships using the psychological contracts as an explanatory framework.  Psychological contracts represent beliefs about mutual obligations between the employee and the employer.  These obligations include both the employer’s obligations to the employee and the employee’s obligations to the employer. Psychological contract theory emphasizes the subjective and perceptual nature of the employee’s beliefs about mutual obligations. These are generally derived from promises (implicitly or explicitly) conveyed between the two parties in the context of recruitment and selection, socialization, performance management, and organizational change. My scholarly work in this area captures two inter-related themes – contract formation (i.e., how employees form their psychological contracts with their employers?) and maintenance of psychological contracts (i.e., what person and contextual factors influence the (non)fulfillment of psychological contracts?).

Second, I am interested in seeking explanations as to why individuals behave in ways that are detrimental to themselves, their employers, and others. Specifically, I explore three converging questions: 1) why do individuals engage in dysfunctional behaviors at work? 2) what are the consequences of these dysfunctional behaviors on employees, their families, and third parties? and 3) what can be done to minimize these dysfunctional behaviors?

My third stream of research explores the conditions in which individuals adapt and persist at work as well as the barriers to workplace participation and advancement. Specifically, my research closely examines the workplace experiences of two distinct groups: 1) students, scientists and professionals in STEM and 2) vulnerable (e.g., victims of intimate partner aggression, migrant workers) and stigmatized individuals (e.g., people living with HIV).

My scholarly work has appeared or been accepted for publication in the Academy of Management Journal, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Human Relations, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Journal of Management Studies, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Leadership Quarterly, Organization Studies, among other scientific outlets.  Since 2008, I have received 11 nationally and internationally competitive grants from Australia (e.g., Australian Research Council – Discovery and Linkage Schemes), Canada (e.g., Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council), and China (e.g., National Natural Science Foundation of China) totaling approximately USD 1.4 million.

Recent Competitive Grants

Zhu, L., Aquino, K., & Restubog, S. L. D. (2018-2023). Moral identity symbolization in organizations: Mechanisms and consequences. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada – Insight Grant. Total funding: C$138,350.

Chen, Z. G. W., De Cieri, H., Jack, G., Kiazad, K., Eva, N., Ilies, R., Restubog, S. L. D., Liden, R., & Muhr, S. L. (2018-2020). Multidisciplinary international network on thriving. Monash University –International Networks of Excellence – Grant Scheme. Total funding: A$298,000.

Kiazad, K., Restubog, S. L. D., Capezio, A., Hom, P., Holtom, B., & Lee, T. (2017-2019). Strengthening Australia’s science workforce: A job embeddedness perspective. DP170101514. Australian Research Council – Discovery Scheme. Total funding: A$172,685.

Keating, B., Goecke, R., Gregor, S., Campbell, J., Roberts, D., Haller, A., Restubog, S. L. D., & Leitch, S. (2017-2019). Preventing railway suicide: An open systems perspective. LP160100910. Australian Research Council – Linkage Scheme. Total funding: A$450,000 (plus A$360,000 contribution from Sydney Trains and Tracksafe Foundation).

Restubog, S. L. D., Kiazad, K., Aquino, K., Zagenczyk, T. J., & Scott, K. L. (2015 – 2017). To step-in or to stand-by: Third party responses to abusive supervision. DP150100545. Australian Research Council – Discovery Scheme. Total funding: A$145,300.

Courses

LER 562 HR Planning and Staffing

LER 590 CMT Career Management