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School of Labor & Employment Relations University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Course Descriptions

Required courses for the master’s program include LER 591 (Employment Relations Systems) and LER 593 (Quantitative Methods, or its equivalent). Also required is a choice of one course from each of the four subject areas (Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior, Labor Markets and Employment, Union Management and Labor Relations Policy, International Human Resource Management), plus five more electives from any area for a total of 48 hours.

General LER Courses

LER 450 European Work Class History
LER 480 U.S. Work Class History Since 1780
LER 523 Organizational Fundamentals for HR
LER 540 Labor Economics I
LER 541 Labor Economics II
LER 547 Labor Law I
LER 556 Industrial Relations Theory
LER 557 Human Resources Theory
LER 559 Micro Research Methods
LER 590CG HR and Corporate Governance
LER 590CCL Contemporary Challenges in Labor & Employment Law
LER 590E Government Regulation and Employment Law
LER 590EO Strategic HRM and the Entrepreneurial Organization
LER 590EW Employee Stress, Well-Being, and Safety
LER 590FBM Fundamentals of Business and Management
LER 590GI Gender Issues in the Workplace
LER 590IM Immigration, Employment, and Public Policy
LER 590WFO Work, Family, and Organizations
LER 590X Macro Research Methods
LER 591 Employment Relations Systems
LER 593 Quantitative Methods in HR (Statistics)

Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior

LER 522 Government Regulation
LER 530 Foundations of Industrial-Organizational Psychology
LER 548 Topics in Personnel Management
LER 561 Compensation Systems
LER 562 Human Resources Planning and Staffing
LER 564 Human Resource Training and Development
LER 565 Human Resources Management and Strategy
LER 567 Negotiation in Human Resource Decisions
LER 568 Firm Performance and Human Resource Management
LER 569 Power and Influence for HRM
LER 570 Leadership for HR Managers
LER 590CM Change Management in HR Organizations
LER 590ICP Influence, Change, and Politics in the Organization
LER 597 Employee Motivation and Performance
LER 598 Implementing High Performance Work Systems

Labor Markets and Employment

LER 440 Economics of Labor Markets
LER 545 Economics of Human Resources
LER 590EGW Economics of Gender and the Workforce
LER 590N Health, Savings and Family Issues in the Workplace
LER 590WPP Workforce Policies and Partnerships

Union Management and Labor Relations Policy

LER 542 Collective Bargaining
LER 543 Workplace Dispute Resolution
LER 590CB Collective Bargaining in Sports and Entertainment

International Human Resource Management

LER 566 International Human Resources Management
LER 590ERC Labor and Employment Relations in China
LER 595 Managing Diversity Globally

440 ECONOMICS OF LABOR MARKETS

Same as Economics 440. A study of the microeconomic determinants of labor demand and supply, economic effects of unions, and macroeconomic labor market problems. Prerequisite: Economics 302 or equivalent. 3 undergrad hours; 2 to 4 grad hours.

450 EUROPEAN WORKING CLASS HISTORY, 1750 TO THE PRESENT

Same as History 450 and Sociology 422. Comparative study of the rise of the working class in European countries; formation, culture and daily life; stratification with the working class; workers in organized labor and revolutionary movements. Prerequisite: One year of college history or consent of the instructor. 3 undergrad hours; 2 or 4 grad hours.

480 U.S. WORK CLASS HISTORY SINCE 1780

Same as History 480. Focuses on working class formation, culture, ideas, and organization; examines daily experience of work and community life; special emphasis on race, ethnicity, and gender in the process of class formation; labor relations and the changing patterns of working class protest and accommodation. Prerequisite: One year of college level history or consent of instructor. 3 undergrad hours; 2 or 5 grad hours.

522 GOVERNMENT REGULATION

Focuses on federal and state legislation, court and agency rulings, and executive orders that regulate a wide range of private and public employment practices including: Title VII and Affirmative Action Compliance; American with Disabilities Act; drug-, HIV-, and genetic testing; Fair Labor Standards Act; Civil Service procedures; Equal Pay Act, Family and Medical Leave Act, and employment-at-will; constitutional protection for employees, job-applicants, and others. Prerequisite: Labor and Industrial Relations 547 or 591, or consent of instructor. 4 grad hours.

523 ORGANIZATIONAL FUNDAMENTALS FOR HR

Increases students’ effectiveness in analyzing and understanding organizations and the organizational context. It relies on the case method and focuses a number of important themes such as organization design; strategy; decision-making; and culture. In order to prepare students for the various transformations that they will experience in their careers, it examines many of these topics in the context of organizational change. Exposes students to basic ideas about key organizational topic – as well as a number of applications of these ideas – in order to give them a framework for organizing past experience. The topics covered do not offer a recipe for what to do in all situations, but rather give students a set of skills and different ways of thinking that can help them address novel problems they will face throughout their lives.

530 FOUNDATIONS OF INDUSTRIAL-ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Same as Psychology 530. Theoretical and empirical foundations of various content areas in industrial-organizational psychology; sample topics include employee selection and placement, training, human factors engineering, work motivation, employee attitudes, leadership, and organizational theory. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology or consent of instructor. 4 grad hours.

540 LABOR ECONOMICS I

Same as Economics 440. Survey of recent trends in the labor force, of real and money earnings, and of the distribution of national income used as the basis for a critical economic analysis of contemporary English and American wage theory. Prerequisite: Economics 302 and 303. 4 hours.

541 LABOR ECONOMICS II

Same as Economics 541. Economic issues and implications involved in hours of work, employment and unemployment, and trade union institutionalism (the impact of the trade union upon the basic institution of a free enterprise economy); emphasis in all cases on the development of appropriate public policy. Prerequisite: Economics 302 and 303. 4 hours.

542 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

Same as Economics 542. Examination of: social values and social science concepts to develop a framework for explaining the basis and shape of collective bargaining as it has been practiced in the United States; government and law, unions, and employers as part of the development of this framework; the environment of collective bargaining with respect to the role of economics and bargaining structure; the negotiating process as the interactive basis for union-management relations; conflict and conflict resolution as part of the negotiating process; wage and other effects of collective bargaining as bargaining outcomes; contemporary changes in union management relations. Case materials and exercises may be used to supplement course materials. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 hours. Graduate credit is not given for both Economics 343 and LER 542.

543 WORKPLACE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

Same as Economics 543 and Law 665. Examination of the use of procedures to resolve employment disputes in both union and nonunion workplaces; comparative analysis of grievance arbitration, interest arbitration, mediation, fact-finding, and combinations of these procedures; special emphasis given to the role of third party intervention. 3 professional hours; 4 grad hours. Professional credit only applicable to Law 665.

545 ECONOMICS OF HUMAN RESOURCES

Same as Human Resource Education 534. A study of the economics of personnel with the modern corporation. Topics include hiring, promotion, evaluation, discrimination, raiding, job definition, pay schemes, benefits, and design of work. Prerequisite: LER 593 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. 4 hours.

547 LABOR LAW I

Same as Law 662. A study of the National Labor Relations Act as amended, the pre-act history of the labor movement, and the judiciary’s response thereto, with emphasis on understanding the problems, experiments, and forces leading to the enactment; includes the negotiation and administration of the collective bargaining agreement, especially the grievance arbitration procedure, its operation and place in national labor policy; and explores the relationship of the individual and the union. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or completion of first year of Law curriculum. 3 or 4 professional hours or 4 grad hours.

556 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS THEORY

An integrated analysis of the principles of labor and industrial relations through the study of the works of the major theorists and their critics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 credit hours.

557 HUMAN RESOURCES THEORY

Continuation of LER 556. Focuses on contemporary research in human research management and related fields. 4 grad hours.

558 STUDENT-FACULTY WORKSHOP

Training and experience for Ph.D. students in the application of social science and industrial relations theory and research methodology to contemporary industrial relations problems through presentation and discussion of faculty and student research. Ph.D. students are required to make presentations and to participate in workshop discussions during the entire period of their campus residency. 4 hours. Approved for both letter and S/U grading.

559 MICRO RESEARCH METHODS

The purpose of this course is to provide doctoral students a foundation for conducting independent, scholarly micro research (i.e., individuals or small groups as the primary unit of analysis) by addressing the components of the research process. This foundation for conducting independent research is based on the research process as an open system of interconnected choices that unfold sequentially: (1) Choosing and Framing a Research Question, (2) Choosing an Hypothesis to Address the Research Question, (3) Choosing a Strategy and Design, (4) Choosing Modes for Treating Constructs, (5) Choosing Forms for Converting Data into Observations, (6) Choosing Procedures to Analyze Data, and (7) Choosing Conclusions for Interpreting Results. 4 grad hours.

561 COMPENSATION SYSTEMS

Compensation theory and practice. This course addresses the theoretical and practical issues associated with the design of effective compensation systems. The design phases include establishing internal equity, external equity, and individual equity. Budgeting and administration are also addressed. Case analyses and computer simulations may be used to supplement course materials. 4 grad hours.

562 HUMAN RESOURCES PLANNING AND STAFFING

Examines conceptual issues, policies and practices relating to the attraction, selection, development, and planning for the most effective utilization of human resources. 4 grad hours.

564 HUMAN RESOURCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

Examination of: theories of behavioral change; application of these theories to training needs, especially with reference to the internationalization of business, changes in labor demand, demographic trends in the United States, and increasing work force diversification; advantages and disadvantages of the various training and development techniques; relation of training to organizational strategies; methods of training evaluation. Special attention is given to the need for and methods of cross-cultural training. Students develop training exercises for class presentation and participation. 2 grad hours.

565 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY

Same as Business Administration 512. Designed to provide integration across the specific functional areas of the human resources management (HRM) field, while at the same time demonstrating the linkages horizontally within HRM and vertically with strategic management of the firm. This case-focused course places emphasis on human resources issues of strategic importance to the organization. Prerequisite: One prior course from the Organizational Behavior and Personnel Management distribution subject area list (in the M.H.R.I.R. degree requirements for the graduate degree in LER). 4 grad hours.

566 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Human Resource management issues examined from the perspective of the multinational firm. Topics include globalization and human resource strategy, management and the structure of multinational firms, dealing with intercultural differences, selecting employees for foreign assignments, training and developing expatriate employees, evaluation and compensation of employees in international assignments. Individual and group projects. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 4 grad hours.

567 NEGOTIATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE DECISIONS

General survey course concerning the strategies and tactics of bargaining and negotiation, with special emphasis on applications in human resource management contexts. Topics covered will include: the structure of negotiated outcomes; integrative bargaining tactics; distributive bargaining tactics; negotiation planning; power, persuasion and influence; communication; negotiating in teams and groups; negotiating using 3rd parties (arbitrators, mediators, agents); cross-cultural negotiations. Students will discuss negotiation issues and build negotiation skills through a series of experiential exercises and cases. Credit is not given for both this course and MBA 505 (Sections W1 and W2: Managerial Negotiations). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An introductory course in social psychology or organizational behavior is preferred but not required.2 grad hours (Eight week course). Students may not receive credit for both this course and Master of B ADM 505 (Section J: Managerial Negotiations.).

568 FIRM PERFORMANCE AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

The purpose of this course is to enable student to understand some basic ideas about and measures of firm performance with heavy emphasis on the role of human resource managers. Students will gain an understanding of how human resource professionals fit into the organization, structure, and function of business firms. Many basic ideas from the field of finance will be studied. The course covers theoretical ideas and has many empirical, policy, and practitioner-relevant applications, all with the goal of providing human resource managers fundamental financial analysis tools to enable them to function effectively in their post-graduate corporate workplaces. 4 grad hours.

569 POWER AND INFLUENCE FOR HRM

This course explores what HR managers need to know to overcome resistance to change, deal with the inevitable stresses associated with change, and implement appropriate change strategies. Topics covered include: (1) assessing bases of power and influence; (2) practicing diagnostic skills to understand behavior in an organizational context; (3) building effective work relationships, both in groups and on a one-to-one basis; and (4) leadership, in terms of alignment, organizational change, and learning to lead. 4 grad hours.

570 LEADERSHIP FOR HR MANAGERS

In contemporary organizations, the HR function is often called on to serve a variety of leadership roles. Thus, HR managers will not only need to learn how to utilize and improve their leadership skills in different and changing contexts, but also how to help other employees become effective leaders. The goals of this course are (1) to analyze and discuss a number of key frameworks that will provide students with knowledge of leadership in different types of organizations, and (2) to provide students with practical tools to help them make sense of their own on-the-job experiences and equip them with basic action-planning skills that they can use on the job.

590A INDIVIDUAL TOPICS

Students in labor and industrial relations may register for this unit with the consent of their curriculum adviser and the adviser under whom the student will perform individual study of research. Such individual work may include special study in a subject matter for which no course is available or an individual research project, including on-the-job research in industry, which is not being undertaken for a thesis. 0 to 8 grad hours.

590CB COLLECTIVE BARGAINING IN SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

This course examines collective bargaining in the contexts of professional sports and entertainment (e.g., movies, theater productions, symphonies and operas, TV and radio programs, and Internet platforms and extensions), while enabling students to cultivate professional skills and evaluate business strategies for sports leagues and entertainment firms. Close attention is paid to antitrust policies in the Sherman Act and Clayton Act that apply to monopolistic employment arrangements such as the reserve system (its opposite is called free agency), the draft and exclusive rights for a player, eligibility restrictions for star amateurs, and other anticompetitive practices in music, theater, movies, and TV. The course examines powerful weapons under the National Labor Relations Act that unions may use to counteract employer cartels in theater, movies, baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and related industries; and equally potent employer responses, such as lockouts and the hiring of striker replacements. The course also explores how employers combine in lawful associations to control labor costs and exploit their investments in physical and human capital; and examines bargaining tactics that enable rank-and-file employees, and star performers, to share in the wealth that they generate. Students are assigned weekly question sets, and are expected to submit a course paper based on the accumulation of readings and simulations. The course features several mock arbitration cases, presented near the end of the course, that cultivate student skills in preparing an arbitration case, evaluating evidence, and engaging in oral advocacy. 4 grad hours.

590CCL CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES IN LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW

This seminar will explore the challenges in enforcing the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) — first enacted during the New Deal and not significantly amended since 1947 — in a dramatically changed social and economic environment. The course will also take into account parallel developments in individual employment rights.

Students will consider the complexity of administering labor law in a politically polarized climate. They will study how new developments in information technology (e.g., electronic monitoring, social media), a changing employment model, and other evolving workplace trends are creating tensions with existing law, including certain statutory concepts (like who is an “employee”, an “independent contractor”, or an “employer”) and legal doctrines (like the scope of mandatory bargaining, privacy rights and rules on communicating at work).
The class will examine whether institutional features of the basic labor law are a good fit with today’s competitive economy, labor market conditions, and worker preferences: for example, the traditional, adversarial model of labor-management relations; the principle of exclusive union representation in decentralized bargaining units; and the prohibition of other forms of workplace representation.
Students will also look at other current issues related to the employment of undocumented workers; efforts to organize domestic workers (excluded from NLRA coverage); and the growing use of mandatory arbitration to resolve disputes arising in non-union workplaces. 2 grad hours.

590CG HUMAN RESOURCES AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

This course enables students to understand the many connections between the HR function in a large corporation and the domain of corporate governance. Students will learn about the process of selection, orientation and operations for members of the board of directors of a public corporation, as well as the work of a board on strategic topics including: executive pay, CEO assessment, executive recruitment and retention, succession planning, leadership development and talent processes, overall business strategy, legal compliance, and related matters. The roles and responsibilities of the HR function will be identified in all of these domains. Special attention will be given to current policy debates on various aspects of corporate governance and special challenges such as relations with institutional investors, international variation in policies and practices, ethics and corporate social responsibility. Course readings will include scholarly articles, consulting studies, and original documents from the corporate world. 4 grad hours.

590CM CHANGE MANAGEMENT IN HR ORGANIZATIONS

Change management is a core skill for all HR professionals. This course covers planned change, unplanned change, and continuous change in organizations. Build skills in making the case for change, understanding resistance to change, working with champions, serving as a change agent, conducting a stakeholder map, using project management tools, tracking results with metrics, implementing new technology, and bridging across cultural, organizational and national boundaries. Particular attention is given to building capability and changing cultures within the HR function so that HR can support change across the organization. 4 grad hours.

590ICP Influence, Change, and Politics in the Organization

Change management is a core skill for all HR professionals. This course will build skills in designing change, making the case for change, understanding resistance to change, working with champions, serving as a change agent, building stakeholder maps, communicating for change, and tracking results with metrics. Particular attention is given to aligning business plans with people plans as well as to building capability within the HR function so that HR can support change across the organization. Students will leave the course having created a change management plan for a real world opportunity in their organization. 4 grad hours.

590E GOVERNMENT REGULATION AND EMPLOYMENT LAW

Focus is on employment law. Topics covered include employee benefits with special emphasis on health insurance; occupational health and safety issues and various employment contractual obligations, statutory exceptions to employment at will; retirement issues including mandatory retirement, ERISA, private pensions and pension benefit discrimination. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 4 grad hours.

590ECA EMPLOYMENT AND COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

This course explores the interrelationship between commercial and employment arbitration. Arbitration is a private justice system. It is relevant because many employers require employees to sign away their right to sue, and to submit disputes to binding arbitration. The course begins in medieval England, when the Statute of the Staple of 1339 allowed businesses to avoid court and to settle disputes by arbitration. An important law, enacted at the behest of William III, created the roots of the present laws that govern arbitration. This history is related to current uses of arbitration. A central question in the course is whether employment and commercial arbitrations are analogous. Both involve business relationships; and the course also shows how certain employment laws draw directly from commercial law principles. But businesses are usually able to negotiate with each other, and also have more freedom to create fair and just arbitration systems. Employees, in contrast, have little or no negotiating power with their employer, and are often forced to take whatever system the employer provides.

590EGW Economic of Gender and the Workforce

Human resources professionals are often confronted with issues of equity between men and women related to hiring, compensation, and task assignment. This course is designed to help students evaluate explanations for differences in economic outcomes between men and women, using economics as a framework.  The course will present evidence on male-female differences in workforce participation, earnings, and occupations.  We will then study how these differences may be explained by various factors, including education, on-the-job training, family demands, and discrimination.  Further, we will study how employer and government policies may affect labor market outcomes of men and women.  Course activities and assignments will highlight how economic intuition has important practical implications for gender-related issues facing human resource professionals.

590EO STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL ORGANIZATION

Using the case method, this course will apply human resource principles and practices to entrepreneurial firms throughout their various developmental stages. The course will center around three stages in the life cycle of an entrepreneurial firm: organizational infancy (1-10 employees); growth and institutionalization (50- 150 employees); going global or being acquired by a much larger company (over 500 employees). Employing class lectures, case material analysis and discussion and guest speakers, the course will provide students with the understanding of the specific human resource needs at each of these organizational phases. In doing so, the course will illustrate the important strategic role of human resource management and its potential contribution to the sustainability and competitive advantage of entrepreneurial firms. 4 grad hours.

590EW EMPLOYEE STRESS, WELL-BEING, AND SAFETY

Organizations and businesses cannot be successful without ensuring health and safety of their workforce. As employees’ health and safety is interlinked with various factors in their work and nonwork environment, there are various approaches in studying employee stress, well-being, and safety (e.g., human factors, public health, etc.). This course will mainly use the “organizational” approach focusing on important psychosocial factors in the workplace that affect employee work stress, well-being, and safety. This course will put an emphasis on organizational interventions to mitigate the impact of stress as well as to promote health and safety among employees. The class will include lectures, in-class learning activities (e.g., exercises, small-group discussions, debate, video clips, instant writing, etc.), and group project.

590ERC LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS IN CHINA

By reforming its planned economy to a “market-based one with Chinese characteristics”, China has emerged as a major economic power. Many businesspeople who until now have had no particular interest in China have had to work in China because there companies are sourcing products there, trying to sell there, or setting up manufacture there. How China develop its labor market institutions, resolves increasing labor-management conflict, and manage its huge labor force are important questions that no serious students of labor relations and HRM can afford to ignore.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the changing labor and employment relations in contemporary China. It has several sections. First, there is a short section I call “background.” In this section, we cover a bit of the historical, political, and social context in which labor and employment relations are embedded in China. Second, we look at the diverse patterns of employment relations and HRM practices in the foreign invested firms, domestic private firms, and state-owned firms. Third, we look at the fragmentation and transformation of China’s working class and the changing role of Chinese trade unions. The latest developments in the Chinese labor law and the trends of labor conflicts will also be covered to provide students with up-to-date knowledge on China’s rapidly changing labor and employment relations.

590FBM FUNDAMENTALS OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

This course provides an overview to several areas of management that influence the role of HR professionals in any organization. Specifically, we address 6 business management topics: (1) Strategic Management, (2) Organizational Structure & Control, (3) Power & Politics, (4) Groups & Teams, (5) Decision Making, and (6) Corporate Governance. Knowing more about these areas of management should help aspiring HR professionals understand what their employers are trying to achieve and how human resource management can add value to any organization. We will discuss the connection between general management topics and human resource management implications each and every class session with special emphasis on this question in our last session.

590GI GENDER ISSUES IN THE WORKPLACE

Despite public and organizational policies for fair and equal treatment for employees in the workplace, both women and men still confront existing and newly emerging challenges at work. For an HR professional, it is quite complex and difficult to address sex and gender issues at work as they are often subtle and intricately related to various individual, organizational, legal, societal, and cultural aspects. Thus, for those who will be in HR positions, it is crucial to understand a range of sex and gender issues at work from diverse perspectives, as well as critically think and discuss how to better manage women and men in organizations. Throughout the course, students will read a mix of book chapters and journal articles on various topics. Example topics include but are not limited to: stereotypes, selection & employment decisions, workplace discrimination, gendered organizational injustice, power & relationships, leadership & leadership development, work-family balance & career, and LGBTQ. In-class activities will consist of a mixture of lectures, small-group debates and discussions, case analyses, individual exercises, and etc. Students will also conduct a team-based learning project designed to facilitate in-depth understandings of a workplace issue that the team selects, and critically think possible ways to address the issue in organizations. By fulfilling the course requirements successfully, students will gain knowledge of the literature to better understand the nature of workplace gender issues from various perspectives, as well as obtain practical insights as to how to manage and address gender issues in organizations.

590IM IMMIGRATION, EMPLOYMENT, AND PUBLIC POLICY

The proposed course examines the magnetic attraction of jobs in the U.S. and immigration, with a particular focus on laws that have regulated or restricted this inflow from the 1800s through the present. Each week, the course integrates three related perspectives on immigration and its impact on the employment relationship in the U.S. Weekly readings will be assigned from each of the following rubrics: (a) Employment Laws, (b) Immigrant Narratives, and (c) Government and Institutions.

590N HEALTH, SAVINGS AND FAMILY ISSUES IN THE WORKPLACE

A substantial part of employees’ compensation comes in the form on non-wage benefits, such as health insurance, retirement plans, paid time-off from work. The goal of this course is to introduce students to some of the major features of employee benefits and work-family issues, including what choices are available to firms in the provision of benefits, what choices firms can offer their employees, and what are the incentives and consequences created by these different choices. The course will also discuss timely public policy issues, such as rising health care costs, Social Security and pension reform, and the Family and Medical Leave Act. 4 grad hours.

590WFO WORK, FAMILY, AND ORGANIZATIONS

The goal of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the interface of work and family in organizations. We will focus on three related topics: (1) individual employees and their families, how they experience work and family/life conflict and how they can achieve balance between work and family life; (2) organizations and the work-family benefits and policies they provide (or not), their usefulness for employees and the benefits they might provide for the employer; and (3) the changing definition/perception of family and issues related to gender and equity in the workplace.The class will include lectures, guest speakers, class discussions, exercises, and films.

590WPP Workforce Policies and Partnerships

This course focuses on the evaluation and analysis of key labor market policies, programs, and interventions. The course has two primary goals. The first is to introduce students to key labor market debates and challenges. The second is a practical goal: to inform students about the various institutions and dynamics that they will face when seeking to hire and train workers in their future HR positions. The focus will be on the U.S. labor market, although the course will cover some international/comparative topics as well. The class will take a multi-disciplinary approach to the topics it addresses; most of the readings will be drawn from the economics, sociology, and public policy literatures.

590X MACRO RESEARCH METHODS

This research methods course is intended for PhD students in industrial relations and related fields who anticipate conducting quantitative empirical research in non-experimental settings. The objective of the course is to provide students with an understanding of how non-experimental research designs and statistical procedures are used to test for causal relationships between variables. The course emphasizes the use of both research design and statistical methods for obtaining unbiased estimates of the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. The course assumes students have a good understanding of multiple regression applied to cross-sectional data. From this basic knowledge, the course focuses on sample selection strategies, the use of panel data, the identification of “natural” experiments and the use of instrumental variable techniques methods useful for testing hypotheses in non-experimental settings. Specific techniques applied to limited dependent variables and duration data will also be introduced.

591 EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS SYSTEMS

A general framework for the analysis of employment relationships. Topics include industrial relations theory, the American system of collective bargaining, inter-country system differences, and human resource management strategies and practices. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 4 grad hours.

593 QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS

Application of statistical methods to problems in human resources and industrial relations. Analysis and presentation of results using computer software. Covers statistical techniques through analysis of variance and multiple regression. Prerequisite: Any elementary statistics course. 4 grad hours.

595 MANAGING DIVERSITY GLOBALLY

Over the past four decades organizational approaches to managing workforce diversity have evolved from meeting the requirements of Title VII law to nurturing effective and diverse work groups as a business necessity. The challenge for managers is to understand the various aspects of diversity and its consequences in organizations. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of how the Human Resource Management function can contribute to leveraging diversity as a competitive advantage. Each week we will examine various HR functions in relation to diversity management practices. By the end of this course students will have a holistic appreciation of the HR tools necessary to implement effective diversity management practices. 4 grad hours.

597 EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE

Managing and motivating employees effectively is one of the most complex and challenging issues facing companies today. While business leaders acknowledge the need for implementing effective performance management systems, recent studies indicate that an overwhelming majority of performance management systems are unsuccessful. Takes a strategic approach to employee motivation and performance starting with a firm level view to reviewing current approaches to employee motivation and performance management. Aims at providing students with practical and conceptual tools that will aid them in future endeavors to design and implement employee development and performance management systems. Format includes in-class discussions, case studies and individual assignments and papers. 4 grad hours.

598 IMPLEMENTING HIGH PERFORMANCE WORK SYSTEMS

Intensive analysis of all aspects of high performance work systems, including work design, reward systems, training, team operations, lean/six sigma systems, and labor-management partnership. Special focus on skills and principles for effective implementation, in ways that advance employee well-being and to organizational effectiveness. 4 grad hours.

599 THESIS SEMINAR

For all students writing theses in labor and industrial relations at the MHRIR and PhD levels. 0 to 16 hours. May be repeated. Approved for S/U grading only.